Criminal Justice Alumni

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welcomeWelcome, alumni! This section of our Criminal Justice website is devoted entirely to you. Whether life has landed you just around the corner or on the other side of the globe, whether you are in your early 20s or your late 90s or some point in between, we are glad to see that you cherish your Rutgers bonds. Thank you for being in touch with us, and we hope you will enjoy catching up on Criminal Justice goings-on.

 

 

 

Department News:

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Dr. Anne M. Piehl, Winner of 2015 Presidential Public Service Award

IMG 8165Dr. Anne Morrison Piehl is the 2015 recipient of the Rutgers College Class of 1962 Presidential Public Service Award.  The Rutgers College Class of 1962 Presidential Public Service Award honors members of the faculty, student body, or staff for volunteer service to government, professional and scholarly organizations, or the public.   Dr. Piehl was honored for her work on state commissions to improve the criminal justice system by reforming corrections policies and criminal sentencing, expanding special drug courts to increase treatment opportunities and reduce prison time, and for her national leadership on the pressing issue of increased incarceration in the United States. She was also recognized for her key role in the Boston “Operation Ceasefire” project, working closely with the police department to strategize how to reduce violent crime and provide needed data to help police departments make changes to improve residents’ lives in their communities.

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Commencement 2014: 32 C.J. Graduates Receive Prestigious Albert Roberts Scholar Award

At this year’s commencement ceremony, 32 Criminal Justice graduates received the prestigious Albert Roberts Scholar Award.  Each year this award is given to graduates who have demonstrated uncommon achievement in the Criminal Justice major.  Students who receive this award must complete a minimum GPA of 3.8 in the major.  This award remembers longtime faculty member Al Roberts, a scholar of victimology and social work, who had exemplary commitment to undergraduate education.

This year’s recipients are: John A. Adamitis, Pamella Alcantara, Paul J. Calvello, Johnna N. Chick, Amanda R. Cohen, Andrew W. Crehan, Kimberly Ann DeFrancesco, James M. Galayda, Joseph Goldstein, Amanda Habeeb, Paulina A. Halat, James P. Hartnett, Kathryn Lee Kifner, Michael Kurpiewski, Matthew L. Lucciola, Mark MaKar, Jason M. Maloney, Justine A. Martolano, Eric M. Moreno, Kimberly A. Mulligan, Kyle T. Nosker, Alexis Okoth, Matthew H. Padd, Robert T. Parker, Stephanie A. Pena, James Perotti, Giustine M. Petrilli, Siam M. Siam, Melissa Rose Sikorsky, Anthony E. Terranova, Kristin M. Vitale, and Joanna Witynska.

 

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Rutgers Launches New Institute for Emergency Preparedness and Homeland Security

TomRidge

Photo: Larry Levanti
Tom Ridge

"Mass casualty events – terrorism, natural disasters and biological superbugs – are the challenges of the 21st century and confronting them calls for multidisciplinary public-private partnerships.

'For the next generation of homeland security professionals, multidisciplined public-private collaboration must be a part of your DNA,' said Tom Ridge, the country’s first homeland security secretary and keynote speaker at a Rutgers conference that brought together experts in emergency preparedness, disaster response and homeland security.

The conference, held June 6, 2014 in New Brunswick, marked the official launch of the Rutgers Institute for Emergency Preparedness and Homeland Security.

To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here.

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Rutgers, Verizon Team Up to Provide Lifeline for Domestic Abuse Survivors – and Boon for Environment

"When is a cell phone more than a cell phone? When it enables a survivor of domestic or dating abuse to reclaim her life.

Close to 2,000 refurbished cell phones are in the hands of formerly vulnerable women and men thanks to a partnership launched in 2008 between Rutgers and Verizon Wireless.

The used phones, dropped off in bins placed strategically on the university’s major campuses in New Brunswick, Camden and Newark, have been wiped free of existing numbers and loaded with 3,000 minutes of nationwide calling or texting.

One program organizer calls the project “an anonymous act of kindness.”

“We know there is a great need for these phones after a woman leaves her abuser,” says Melanie Hoffman of Rutgers’ Center on Violence against Women and Children (VAWC), which coordinates the campus effort. “The ability to have a ‘clean’ phone gives her back a sense of empowerment and a sense of security.”

Men are also subject to domestic violence. A 2010 survey by the U.S. Department of Justice and the Centers for Disease Control found that more than 5 million men had experienced abuse at the hands of their wives or girlfriends in the previous year."  To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here.

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Children Are Collateral Victims When Mom Serves Time

JSiegel

Photo: Courtesy of Jane Siegel
Jane Siegel

"John was 15 when Rutgers academic Jane Siegel encountered him for the first time. His mother was in prison – a chronic thief and drug addict, she had been arrested 31 times and convicted 15 times.  

Ten years later, John’s own rap sheet included eight arrests and two convictions. He’d held a series of dead-end jobs and saw little hope of anything better. He was chronically depressed.

Siegel, an associate professor and former chair of the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice at Rutgers-Camden, hopes to bring people like John out of the shadows.

Through her 2011 book Disrupted Childhoods: Children of Women in Prison (Rutgers University Press), and more recently through a series of in-depth follow-up interviews with young adults, the researcher has trained a spotlight on a population whose voices are rarely heard.”

To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here.

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Geekadelphia's Scientist of the Year

KimberleeMoranKimberlee Sue Moran is no ordinary geek. As Geekadelphia’s Scientist of the Year, her crowning achievement was blowing up a bus filled with dead animals to help first responders learn how to identify bombing victims.


“They got an understanding of debris patterns and developed a protocol where they could reconstruct what happened and recover both biological and non-biological evidence,’’ explains Moran, a Rutgers-Camden forensic archaeology professor and grant facilitator.
 
Her forensic exercise was a success. But what was so geeky about it?
 
Maybe the fact that Moran and her assistants created characters for each animal, complete with names, occupations and phony IDs. Then they dressed them in human clothes. The animals, from the Rutgers Farm in New Brunswick, had died of natural causes or been put down due to illness.
 
The Geekadelphia website explains why Moran was a winner. “(She) has done a lot to bring the world of forensic science to the Philadelphia region..."  To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here.

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Rutgers University Teams with A.C.L.U. to End Solitary Confinement for Incarcerated Juveniles

Cohen-1

Credit: Rutgers Today
Laura Cohen, Director of the Rutgers Criminal and Youth Justice Clinic

“Solitary confinement for incarcerated juveniles has been condemned by psychologists, federal agencies and the United Nations for hindering rehabilitation efforts and damaging children’s mental health.

 

Yet according to a Rutgers juvenile justice advocate, many of the 300 juveniles who are incarcerated daily in secure facilities in New Jersey have been punished with solitary confinement for several consecutive days.
 
'Adolescents' brains continue to develop well into their 20s. As a result, they are uniquely vulnerable to the traumatic effects of isolation,' says Laura Cohen, a Rutgers School of Law-Newark professor and director of the Rutgers Criminal and Youth Justice Clinic.
 
Rutgers law school faculty are working with the ACLU and civil rights and child welfare organizations to end the practice. They created a petition urging the New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission, which doesn’t release statistics on how often solitary is used, to substitute other  punishments instead."

 

To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here.

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Commencement 2013: 37 C.J. Graduates Receive Prestigious Albert Roberts Scholar Award

CJ2013At this year’s commencement ceremony, 37 Criminal Justice graduates received the prestigious Albert Roberts Scholar Award.  Each year this award is given to graduates who have demonstrated uncommon achievement in the Criminal Justice major.  Students who receive this award must complete a minimum GPA of 3.8 in the major.  This award remembers longtime faculty member Al Roberts, a scholar of victimology and social work, who had exemplary commitment to undergraduate education.

This year’s recipients are: Diana Marie Abdallah, Mena Beshay, Jason M. Boyle, Michael J. Brown, Raquel P. Catrocho, Stephanie Chaglla, Steven J. Criscio, Fortunato A. Damiano, Sandra Ghobraiel, Jessica Guarracino, Jamie Y. Kang, Colleen E. King, Brian R. Lorentzen, Jerome A. Mangroo, Douglas M. Marino, Thomas R. Mathews, Andrew M. Maza, Connor Francis Montferrat, Francesca J. Nuñez, Leah Anne Palmieri, Christopher C. Patras, Aubrey L. Person, Neelum Quraishi, Joseph Radwanski, Joseph R. Rocha, Ramona Alliah Ross, Victoria M. Saraiva, Katherine Sarrico, Jocelyn Sperlazza, Jessica L. Stockl, Caroline E. Sweeney, Kara A. Trivolis, Natalie A. Twerdowsky, Forhad Ullah, Janel A. Valladares, Jennifer L. Wittmer, and Devin T. Wright.

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Rutgers-Led Group Recommends Best Practice Guidelines for Halfway Houses in New Report

Nancy Wolff

Credit: Nick Romanenko, Rutgers University
Nancy Wolff, Director of the Center for Behavior Health Services and Criminal Justice Research

“A report issued today by a group of experts led by a Rutgers University corrections policy expert sets forth new best practice guidelines for how New Jersey’s agencies work with halfway houses, including the push for accountability and a rewards model based on performance.

 

The report, “Halfway from Prison to the Community: From Current Practice to Best Practice,” includes 11 recommendations, the result of three roundtable discussions held at Rutgers by 19 educators, advocates, policymakers and corrections practitioners between August and November 2012.

“When states contract out for such services, they should make absolutely clear what they expect those services to be and how they expect them to..."

 

To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here.

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Criminology Graduate Hired in Field of Forensics

Stephanie A. Rodriguez (Class of 2011), is a graduate of Rutgers College who majored in Biology and minored in Criminology. She was in the first group of Rutgers students who completed the first Forensics Science course offered through the Program in Criminal Justice in the fall of 2009. Stephanie also interned for Professor Mark Desire, Program in Criminal Justice, and was recently hired to work under Dr. Desire with the Department of Forensic Biology as part of the New York City Office of Chief Medical Examiner. She works as a criminalist and specializes in missing person identification.

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Criminal Justice Major Published in Columbia Undergraduate Law Review

MontferratConnor F. Montferrat (Class of 2013), a Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences student double-majoring in Criminal Justice and Political Science was published in the Columbia Undergraduate Law Review. “Repeal Rule 413 of the Federal Rules of Evidence: The Admissibility of Evidence of Prior Sex Offenses” was a paper Connor originally completed for Dr. Lennox Hinds’ Crimes Against Humanity course. His paper was published in Volume VII, Issue I, Fall 2012 edition of the Columbia Undergraduate Law Review. You can find a copy of this issue and Connor’s paper here.

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Rutgers Newark Criminal Justice Professors Help Police Deploy Technology that Predicts Where Crime Will Likely Happen

NewarkTechA two-year $500,000 grant from the National Institute of Justice will enable criminal justice professors at Rutgers Newark to deploy “risk terrain modeling” technology—a technology that predicts where crime will likely happen—in six police agencies nationwide. Professors Leslie Kennedy, Joel Caplan, and Eric Piza will be using this technology to assist police agencies in Texas, Illinois, Colorado, Arizona, Missouri, and Newark, New Jersey. To read the full article published in Rutgers Today, click here

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Commencement 2012: 16 C.J. Graduates Awarded Prestigious Albert Roberts Scholar Award

CommencementAt this year’s commencement ceremony, 16 Criminal Justice graduates received the prestigious Albert Roberts Scholar Award. Each year this award is given to graduates who have demonstrated uncommon achievement in the Criminal Justice major. Students who receive this award must complete a minimum GPA of 3.8 in the major. This award remembers longtime faculty member Al Roberts, a scholar of victimology and social work, who had exemplary commitment to undergraduate education.

 

This year’s recipients are: Kristine Arandela, Lucas Biebelberg, Jill Colban, Brian De Jesus, Evan Hackler, Jordan Henry, Jasmine Love, Jason Montalvo, Megan Moran, Jessica Saad, Kaitlin Savarese, Paige Schilling, Henri Schraeder, Edward Sulca, Marilyn Tenpenny, and Chelsea Wait.

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In Memoriam: Albert R. Roberts

Domestic ViolenceSocial Workers Desk ReferenceAlbert R. Roberts died on June 23, 2008. Dr. Roberts taught in the Program in Criminal Justice in the School of Arts and Sciences.

 

Albert R. Roberts, Ph.D., Rutgers Professor and author was born in the Bronx, N.Y., and lived in Kendall Park for the past 19 years. He received his B.S. degree in sociology from C.W. Post College, his M.A. degree in sociology from Long Island University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Maryland, School of Social Work.

 

Roberts was a college professor for 35 years, and for the past 19 years taught criminal justice and social work courses at Rutgers University. Earlier in his career, he taught in the School of Social Work at Indiana University in Indianapolis, the University of New Haven, Brooklyn College, and New York Institute of Technology. Roberts has more than 250 scholarly publications, including 38 books, and was the Editor-in-Chief of the highly acclaimed "Social Worker's Desk Reference," published by Oxford University Press. Until his death, he was the Editor-in-Chief of two professional journals: "Brief Treatment and Crisis Intervention" and "Victims and Offenders." He was also the editor of three book series: the Springer Series on Social Work, the Springer Series on Family Violence, and the Greenwood/Praeger Series on Social and Psychological Issues.

 

Professor Roberts was the recipient of many awards for his teaching and his scholarly publications. He was a Fellow of the American Orthopsychiatric Association and a member of numerous professional organizations, including the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the Council on Social Work Education, and the National Association of Social Workers.

 

Crisis Intervention HandbookSon of the late Harry and Evelyn Roberts, and brother of the late William Roberts, he is survived by his wife of 36 years, Beverly Schenkman Roberts; a son, Herbert Seth Roberts; a niece and nephew, Evelyn Roberts Levine and Harrison Roberts; four grandnieces; and a sister-in-law, Carole Roberts.

 

Special Requests: Memorial contributions may be offered to:

Pancreatic Cancer Action Network

2141 Rosecrans Ave,

El Segundo, CA 90245

(www.pancan.org).


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